Big Shift #5 Outcomes To Practice

Over the past few weeks students in Santa Cruz have interviewed each other and adults in their school about what makes a good life and the role of school in society for our pilot school partnership #studentvoice project.  Yesterday they identified themes from their interviews and presented to their peers. Read their interviews!

The project is a perfect example for this month's big shift: Outcomes to Practice
It's who students practice being in school that will drive outcomes, not just creating better outcome metrics. Are students practicing creativity, curiosity, empathy, meaning making, and citizenship daily?  If so, they will develop it.  If not, unlikely. 

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Tye RipmaComment
Emma and the “outcome blinders”: How a hyper-focus on outcomes made us forget what matters

We were so focused on outcomes, we forgot a single and powerful truth: who and how Emma practices being during the school day ultimately affects who she becomes. If we have student practice frustration, boredom, isolation, and immerse them in an environment that highlights their weaknesses then we should not be surprised when they disengage with school, becomes recalcitrant, and halt practicing activities that might lead to skill development.

If we want a child to be well and do well in the future, we need to provide an environment in which they can practice being well and doing well now.

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Tye RipmaComment
Big Shift #4: Making Individuals to Fostering Environments: April 2018 Newsletter

We adore the idea of using Valentine's Day as a reminder to celebrate all the different kinds of love and moments of joy in our lives and the world.

This fits well with the big mindshift of the month: from Efficiency to Possibility: We need to move out of efficiency frames and into possibility frames when we design school practice and policy.  Why?  Because designing for efficiency is destroying all the joy and love in school.

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Big Shift #3: Critique to Vision: March 2018 Newsletter

We adore the idea of using Valentine's Day as a reminder to celebrate all the different kinds of love and moments of joy in our lives and the world.

This fits well with the big mindshift of the month: from Efficiency to Possibility: We need to move out of efficiency frames and into possibility frames when we design school practice and policy.  Why?  Because designing for efficiency is destroying all the joy and love in school.

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Every Classroom (and Congress) Needs a Peace Circle

"This is the point: we cannot engineer kindness, grit, empathy, or any other skill into students. We cannot just teach isolated lessons and expect them to one day know how to use them. As teachers, we must build environments in which these skills are practiced across the school day– because it is only through this authentic practice that students will actually learn the skills we know will help them thrive as individuals and work together as a community."

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Nicole HenselComment
Big Shift #2: Efficiency to Possibility (Instrumental to Intrinsic): February 2018 Newsletter

We adore the idea of using Valentine's Day as a reminder to celebrate all the different kinds of love and moments of joy in our lives and the world.

This fits well with the big mindshift of the month: from Efficiency to Possibility: We need to move out of efficiency frames and into possibility frames when we design school practice and policy.  Why?  Because designing for efficiency is destroying all the joy and love in school.

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Big Shift #1: Symptoms to Systems - January 2018 Newsletter

We're starting the new year focusing on the first big shift in thinking required for real change in education: Symptoms to Systems. So much of our time in schooling and school reform is spent addressing symptomatic issues, while the real systems problems get ignored. A tell-tale sign that something is a systems issue is when symptoms are widespread and predictably patterned across different kinds of people and situations (e.g. anxiety and depression across many high-performing institutions, drop-outs in low-income institutions).

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Why I Left Teaching

As an energetic and optimistic 22-year old, I entered my Kindergarten classroom in Denver, Colorado with dreams for my students: that they would be empowered, fulfilled, and flourishing individuals. If I could teach them the knowledge, beliefs, and character that would help them create good lives and contribute to a more beautiful society, I would have succeeded as an educator.  I never would have predicted that a short three years later I would wonder if I were actually doing more harm than good.

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